395) Social Media Success

Social Media Success

Social media … like LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter … has created a whole new experience for networking. Now, if you’re looking to find success networking on social media, there is no magic. There are no secret formulas or short cuts. The key is to follow these three important steps.

One – get your account set up or, if you’re already set up, expand your usage to be more effective. Two – schedule time to take a little action each day. And three – commit to keeping after it.

Yep, it’s that simple. Sure, there is a lot there and much to master and learn. Nothing, however, says you need to climb the learning curve in one day, one month or even one year. Even the most proficient users of social media find that they are continually learning new things.

Besides, no one is judging you on your proficiency using social media. They are only judging you on the value you bring. So, get started.


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394) A Lesson From Master Networkers

A Lesson From Master Networkers

Some people are master networkers. They seem to effortlessly establish, develop and maintain a framework of individuals comprised of family, friends, co-workers, business colleagues and even competitors.

How do they do this? The reality is that master networkers are not necessarily harder working than others. They are not necessarily any more educated. And it has nothing to do with their social status, appearance or luck. The difference is the manner and approach in which master networkers interact with their networks.

Masters know that they need to be more than simply acquainted with their network. Masters look for a deeper relationship with those they associate with. In summary, master networkers strive to develop a mutual sense of knowing, liking and trusting amongst their contacts.

Masters are aware – at least on some level of consciousness – that the notion of ‘know, like and trust’ is the key to forging a powerful and productive relationship. And that is a simple lesson you can take from the master networker.


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393) The Formula Of Trust

The Formula Of Trust

On the NetworkWise blog, social architect Adam Connors shares that the formula for building trust in any professional network is as simple as providing value over an extended period of time. In short, time plus value equals trust. 

To offer value, Connors states that “You could comment on and share recent blog post. Or give advice on a project they’re working on.” But Connors then goes on to acknowledge that there are so many other ways you can bring value, like being a good listener, being a mentor, or just being there for them in general.

As for time, Connors encourages you to make time to spend with your network, whether over a meal, just talking on the phone, or maybe volunteering together, as contact alone serves to build trust.

But more importantly, Connors chides you to ensure that you follow through on your commitments or promises. Consistently doing this demonstrates that you’re reliable, which is just another word for trustworthy.


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392) Creating A Referral Machine



Creating A Referral Machine

If you’re in business, you want referrals. After all, this is the best place to be: where others are directing clients to you. Just because you want this, however, doesn’t mean that you get it. To create this referral machine, you must build it. 

To do so, the onus is on you to establish relationships. After all people do business with and refer business to those that they know, like and trust.

As you build those relationships, you must also empower your network to not just understand what you do. In addition, you need to help these people to be able to both recognize opportunities for you as well as talk about you to others.

Finally, to maintain this referral machine, you must remain in continual contact with your network to cultivate these relationships. This is the grease that ensures the referrals flow.

Yes, this all takes work, but the rewards far outpace the effort.


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390) Big Impact From Small Things

Big Impact From Small Things

To build a great following of wonderful people, you need to devote time and energy to helping others. Giving referrals. Making introductions. Sharing information. Generally, adding value.

Sure, it might seem like that Herculean effort is the most noteworthy. The bigger the help, the bigger the splash in someone else’s life, right? However, as word of mouth referral expert Matt Wards reminds us: “Sometimes it’s doing something small for someone that really makes a big impact.”

What Ward implies is that you’re not always in a position to share referrals that make someone’s quarter or information that alters the landscape of someone’s business. You are, however, always able to do something. Write a note. Call to just check in. Offer encouragement.

While these small things can seem inconsequential, you never know what impact they can bring. And sometimes the impact can be really big. So commit to doing something small today. And see what it leads to tomorrow.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.

389) Network Pyramid Capstones

Networking Pyramid Capstones

In the 1960s, Yale researcher Stanley Milgram adopted the phrase “six degrees of separation”. This phrase came about because, on average, there were a half-dozen intermediaries involved in the delivery of packets of information from randomly selected people in Omaha to a stockbroker in Boston.

Interestingly, however, while the packets originated from numerous random points, the final step of their delivery came from only a handful of people. From this, Milgram concluded that a very small number of people are linked to everyone else in just a few steps, and the rest of us are linked to the world through them.

To find these “super connectors” in your life, write down the names of 50 random contacts and trace them back to how you were introduced. A pattern will emerge showing that a large percentage of your contacts likely originated from relatively few individuals.

These people are called network pyramid capstones and they are instrumental in your world. Devote time and energy to building your relationship with them.


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388) Initiating Contact

Initiating Contact

When you’re at networking events, it is simply up to you to initiate contact. That is, making contact is 100% your obligation, if you want a productive experience.

You can, however, easily make it happen with three simple steps.

  1. Make meaningful eye contact with people, where you look at them and they look you back in the eye. There is nothing strange about this. It is completely human.
  • With eye contact established, smile. This is not a forced smile, but a genuine “it is good to see you” smile. Chances are, human nature will kick in and they will smile back.
  • With that eye contact and a smile, simply say, “hello.” They may say “hello” in return, or they may say nothing.

Whatever the case, it was your objective (as well as sole obligation) to initiate contact. You’ve done that. Congratulations!


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387) The Sun Still Shines

The Sun Still Shines

In his book The Power of Optimism, corporate psychologist and motivational speaker Tim Shurr reminds readers that “even on the darkest, cloudiest, rainiest day, the sun is still shining – you just can’t see it.” He continues that in reality, you’re just not looking for it.

So, when times are tough, and problems appear overwhelming (and everyone has these days) know that solutions are right there. Right there within reach. But you have to take a deep breath, step back and relax, and start to look for them.

And as you look trust that it’s not a question of “if” you will find the solution. Rather, it’s a matter of where you’ll find the solution and what it will be.

So next time you find yourself embroiled in a day that feels dark, cloudy, and rainy, remember that somewhere around you is the answer that will serve as some sunshine. You just need to look for it.


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386) One Size Does Not Fit All


One Size Does Not Fit All

In business, you’re not a one-trick pony. That is, there is lots to you as a business professional and you serve clients in many, many ways. As such, don’t limit yourself to a single 30–second commercial that becomes tired and seemingly trite in time.

Rather, start by taking the time to develop a variety of small business introductions for yourself. Work one up for each aspect on your aspect of your business.

Then with that foundation, work up some variations on those. Make some that involve short anecdotes. Make some that are cute and entertaining. Have others that play well in a more professional setting.

Don’t limit yourself. Be so prepared with material, that you appear to come up with great introduction on the fly. Ones that are not just engaging, but more importantly productive.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.