347) The Leading Impression


The Leading Impression



Upon meeting, one of the first things people use to form an opinion about you is your business card. Right or wrong, that little piece of thin cardstock creates a leading impression about who you are, what you do, and even how well you do it.

For this reason, make an investment in your business cards. Enlist the services of a designer to craft a logo that’s appropriate for you. And then have them work it into a sharp looking layout that serves to represent you long after you depart from an encounter.

From here, do NOT skimp on its production. Don’t generate these tiny billboards by running thin, perforated cardstock through your laser printer. Rather, find a quality printer. And then have this professional make up on hardy cardstock 500 to a 1,000 business cards.

Remember, your business card is your leading impression. So, approach its design and production that way.


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Build Your Network One Relationship at a Time

Build Your Network One Relationship at a Time

Getting people to Know, Like, and Trust you is dependent upon human interaction. That is face-to-face, in-person conversations vs. connections made over social media. That said, remember to build your network one relationship at a time.

There is an Indian proverb that says, “An eagle that chases two rabbits, catches none.” This is true of relationships as well. You will not be able to develop lasting Know, Like, and Trust if you are focused on multiple relationships at any one time. In fact, the more relationships you attempt to develop at once, the less effective you become.

The point to this topic is this: As you are out being involved, do not feel the need to race about meeting as many people as possible … having quick, shallow conversations … collecting business cards and then haphazardly following up with a plethora of people you can hardly remember.

Rather work to have involved conversations with just a few people (and then attend another gathering and do the same).

  • Learn about people.
  • Invest time in who they are.
  • Be genuinely interested.
  • Conduct yourself so that when you follow up, you can do so with substance.         

By networking in this manner, your network will grow more quickly as people begin to Know, Like, and Trust you. So don’t be an eagle chasing two rabbits and catching none. Instead, build your network one relationship at a time.


Learn more about networking and AmSpirit Business Connections at www.amspirit.com.

233) Networking – A Great Adventure

In his book Three New People: Make the Most of Your Daily Interactions and Stop Missing Amazing Opportunities, author Brian Miller makes this powerful statement: “You have no idea what kind of opportunities await you just on the other side of the next connection.”

It’s true. New connections lead to an adventure of wonder.

Yes, new connections introduce you to a whole new roster of people that then open doors to places and things you never knew existed.

No doubt, new connections also become dynamic colleagues who serve to enhance your abilities and expand your vision of what’s possible for you professionally.

And, of course, these new connections become wonderful friends creating a new level of laughter, support and happiness in your life.

Yes, beyond that first handshake with someone new is an awesome journey of amazement and wonder. You just need to make the effort to embark on the adventure.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.


231) Tiny Billboards

According to Susan RoAne, author of How To Work A Room: The Ultimate Guide To Making Lasting Connections In Person and Online:

“The purpose of business cards is to give people a tangible, physical way to remember you.” 

In a sense, your business cards serve to brand you, just like a billboard brands a business or product. After all, it’s completely pointless to meet others unless you are committed to having them remember you. Right? This begs a series of questions for you to consider:

  • What does your business card tell others about you?
  • Is it something worth remembering?
  • And, is that information presented in a manner that’s easy to understand?

Assuming your business card is a great and memorable representation of you, then answer this: Do you always have clean, crisp business cards to distribute?  In your pocket?  In your portfolio?  In your car?

As you prepare to venture out today, ensure that you’ve got a great business card and plenty of them.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.