218) Don’t Misrepresent Yourself

It is said that to conceal a single lie, it takes at least 15 other lies. And then to conceal each of those 15 lies, you’ll need a whopping 225 more lies just to conceal one single incident of deceit. And from there … well, you get the picture.

It takes far more time and energy to conceal a falsehood than it does to simply own up to and deal with the truth.

Be honest in all matters, even as it relates to your personal brand. You know in your heart of hearts when effective marketing or spin crosses the line into outright misrepresentation. So, you’re best to stay well on the right side and away from the gray area.

This is the reality: eventually an exaggeration “gone-too-far” will come back to haunt you. This moment could then quickly destroy any and all credibility you you’ve worked so hard to build.

So be honest. Don’t misrepresent yourself.


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217) Energy Follows Focus

On the July 5th 2019 episode of the How To Be Mesmerizing podcast, host Tim Shurr reminded his audience that the path they’re on (even though it might be fraught with difficulty) is the path they’re supposed to be on.

As for dealing with life’s trials and tribulations, Shurr offered this advice:

When facing a challenging situation, whatever it might be, take a step back and do what you can to ignore the challenge itself. Instead, in that moment, ask yourself what outcome you really want.

In this same spirit, he encouraged his audience not to commiserate about where they are in life. Rather, he advocated that they think about and get a clear picture as to who they wanted to be.

Keep your eye on the positive. Zero in on a vision of hope and promise. Shurr’s point is simple. Where your focus goes, your energy follows.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.

216) Adhere To The Golden Rule

Do you want more from your network? Of course, you do. You’re not alone. Everyone does.

Everyone wants more referrals. Everyone wants to be connected to more opportunities. Everyone seeks inroads to great, game-changing information. And everyone wants all the other benefits that a network can provide. So, like everyone else, you want more from your network.

What most people fails to realize, however, is that if you want to get more from your network you need to focus on giving more to it. Though this might seem completely counterintuitive, it’s true.

This is often referred to as the Golden Rule of Networking and is simply stated as “Give First; Get Second.” This law is universal and is rooted in human nature, spanning time and remaining consistent from one culture to another.

So, if you want more from your network, begin today infusing it with referrals, opportunities, contacts, energy and whatever else could help others. In time, this will come back to you in plenty.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.


215) Rainmaker Contacts

It is great to be connected to people who want what you sell here and now. It can, however, be more lucrative long-term to build your network with contacts who can connect you to these clients on a consistent basis.

These are rainmaker contacts and they are vital to ongoing success. Who are they? These are entrepreneurs or professionals who don’t do what you do, but their clientele is virtually identical to yours. For example, a business banker would benefit from meeting a CPA type, as these accountant types can refer their clients.

With this understanding, do three things. One, identify who are the potential rainmaker contacts in your world. Next, find opportunities to interact with these entrepreneurs and professionals. Then, finally, from time to time ask your network to introduce you to them.

These are three important steps as rainmaker contacts represent a treasure trove of new business.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.


209) Was That Networking Event Worthwhile?

Here are questions you likely ponder after most any networking event are: Was it worth the trip? What it worth the time spent mingling? Are the contacts I made worth anything? Was that event worthwhile?

Know this: In reality, the answers to these questions are always a resounding “Absolutely!”

Think about it: Every event offers value. Yes, some events offer more value than others. They all have value, however.

And, yes, the value from some events is more immediate, while the true value of others takes time to develop and fully present itself.

So, certainly assess the value of events as best you can. And certainly, track your results however you deem appropriate.

But before you completely pass judgment on an event, remember this: The benefits of any networking activity may not present themselves for weeks, months, or even years. So be patient. Keep attending those events.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.


204) Challenge Equals Change

Try this: Walk 100 steps in any direction and then walk back. Can you feel the burn? Is your body sculpted? Of course not.

Now try this: Go to the library, pick up a business or leadership book and read the back cover. Are your business “smarts” appreciably improved for doing that? It’s not likely.

Final exercise: Log onto social media (LinkedIn, Twitter, whatever) and ‘like’ a handful of posts. Is your network now teaming with loads of great, new relationships? Nope! No way.

These three exercises are meant to illustrate a point. If you want to change yourself, you need to challenge yourself. A healthy life needs you to invest more than a couple hundred steps. An improved business acumen requires real experience and consistent learning. Your network won’t grow appreciably with only a few likes or shares.

The lesson is simple: If it doesn’t challenge you, it’s not going to change you.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.


196) Would You Stop?

In his book, “No One Gets There Alone” author Dr. Rob Bell poses an insightful question: “Would you stop?”

To elaborate, after a grueling one-mile, open-water swim, Bell was 32 miles into the biking portion of a triathlon when his back tire blew out. With neither the equipment nor ability to affect a repair, his race seemed to be over.

Then two competitors stopped, sacrificing their standing in the race, and helped Bell back into the competition. As he raced on, he couldn’t help but ponder, “Would I have stopped?”

That was a moment of great inspiration for him. Bell now not only stops when he sees someone in need, he actively looks for the opportunity. And he doesn’t limit this to athletic competition. It has become a way of life, making small sacrifices to aid others.

So, when he asks others “Would you stop?”, it’s not really a question, but rather an invitation to be part of his team of selfless heroes.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.


194) Houston … We Have A Problem

“Houston … We have a problem.” In April 1970, James Lovell uttered these words following an explosion aboard Apollo 13. His journey to the surface of the moon was over. His life was literally on the line.

What lay ahead was nothing but adversity and uncertainty.

But in that moment, Lovell wanted to know if his shipmates were content with letting fate determine their destiny or whether they were committed to controlling the course of their lives. So, he asked them “Gentleman, what are your intentions?”

The crew of Apollo 13 responded. Using ingenuity, they guided the crippled Apollo 13 successfully back to Mother Earth.

While your situation may never be anywhere near as dire as that of Apollo 13, you will face adversity. In these moments, What Are Your Intentions?

Just as with the crew of Apollo 13, commit to control the course of your life. If you do this, no matter your situation, there is no doubt that you will have a safe landing.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.


Networking Activities

Networking opportunities fall into three distinct categories: Face To Face … Electronic Encounters … and, Social Media.

FACE TO FACE networking opportunities including, various activities when you are out and about with people. These include:
• Structured Networking, including Toastmasters, Rotary, Lions Club, or organizations like AmSpirit Business Connections.
• Networking Events, including trade shows, volunteer activities, business after-hours, Chamber events, seminars, and even social events like tailgates.
• Free-Form Networking, including perhaps a round of golf, meeting over a cup of coffee, or just getting together.

With respect to networking in the modern age, much of what you can do face to face, you can accomplish via ELECTRONIC ENCOUNTERS. More specifically, you network over the telephone, over e-mail and through texting. Remember networking is more than selling and prospecting. It is two or more people working towards their mutual benefit – sharing referrals or contacts, passing on information, being encouraging and supportive.

Finally, in the 21st century, technological innovation has given way to SOCIAL MEDIA websites. These are nothing more than virtual venues where you can network – again, share referrals or contacts, pass on information, being encouraging and supportive.

The main three social media applications are LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter, but beyond these are dozens and dozens of others. If used properly, social media will allow you to network on a massive scale, on a worldwide basis, 24 hours a day and seven days a week, and do so with incredible information about your networking partner before you even make contact.

Assessing Your Network Asset

Once you realize that networking builds value in your life, the natural reaction is, “How much value do I have?”

Certainly, this is not as simple as counting change or tallying hours worked. And while there are complicated formulas for assessing one’s social capital, there are three rather simplistic means of making a thumbnail measurement. Let’s touch on each of these.

Assessment #1 is Connectivity. Answer this, “Who do I know?” Stop and think about it. Take an inventory of the people you know. High School. College. Neighbors. Community. Church. The gym. And the list goes on. You likely know lots of people, and as you meet more your social capital grows.

Assessment #2 is Density. Think about it. If you knew ten people and those ten people all knew each other, your network is so dense (or interconnected) that the social capital is nowhere near as great as if you knew ten people and none of those people knew each other. So it is not just how many people you know that is important, but how many of those people know each other. Certainly, it is not reasonable to think that no one in your network knows anyone else, but you do want to have a broad, diverse network where you know lots of people and they are relatively disconnected from one another.

Assessment #3 is Potential. It is important how many people you know. And it is important how many of those people you know, know each other. But another means of assessing your network is to look through the people you know and see the people they know that you do not currently know. If you know ten people and they have relatively poor networks themselves, you are worse off than if you know only five people, but those five are extremely well connected.

Take a moment now and then to assess the value of your network. In these moments, ask yourself, “How can I increase my network Connectivity, lessen its Density, as well as enhance its Potential?”