30-Second Commercial 5 of 8

Everyone has competition, including you. What makes you unique amongst your competition?

Again, WHY you? Your 30-second commercial needs to convey credibility and confidence that serves to answer that question before it is asked. Consider an example.

“Not only have I helped more than 100 people get into the right franchise, I also spent 10 years as a CPA … helping my clients know what they were getting.”

Who would a prospective franchisee prefer to work with? Just anyone or someone with this background? The answer should be obvious (at least the question was intended to be rhetorical). The point is that Inspiring Confidence (answering the “WHY you?”) is vital to your 30-second commercial.

265) Focusing On Being Your Best

It’s a natural human tendency, isn’t it? You know, to look over your shoulder to see what the other person has got. Thoughts flow through your mind like …

  • I wonder if I’m in better shape;
  • I wonder if their house is worth more; or,
  • I wonder if they make more than I do.

While these ponderings seem to be natural, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t work to push these thoughts aside. You know, focus on you. On what you have. On what more you’re looking to achieve.

This is the reality: It does nothing for you to compare yourself to anyone else. After all, no two situations are alike. You have a unique path to this point in time and as such comparing outcomes is pointless.

Never compare yourself to anyone else. Just focus on being your best and doing your best. Not necessarily “the” best, just your best. Great things will follow from that alone.


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260) Airplane Maintenance Mindset

While air travel is faster, more efficient and safer than ever before, we still need to contend with gravity – the Earth’s unrelenting pull on all physical objects.

Therefore, to keep air travel safe, those in air transportation vigilantly maintain aircraft. While they might never change the engine in their car, you can be sure they replace aircraft engines on a routine basis … whether it needs it or not. After all, being stranded on US-41 is no big deal but being stalled at 10,000 feet is.

So, as you cultivate the relationships within your growing network, care for them as you would maintain an airplane. Don’t wait for a relationship to be broken before you tend to it.

Never chance that something might go wrong. Rather, routinely reach out to the important people in your life, whether personal or professional. See how they’re doing. And in so doing, you’ll show that you care. That will serve to keep your entire fleet of relationships airborne.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.


259) Own Your Failures

If you’ve been at this game of business long enough you will no doubt experience failures and setbacks. Some will be relatively small, such as not upselling a client at the 11th hour on the last day of an already record month. Others will be large, such as not getting the promotion or losing that big client. And a good many will be somewhere in between.

Whatever the case, these moments will leave you feeling a degree of disappointment. And that’s okay, as that’s part of being driven and goal oriented. What’s not okay, however, is blaming others or circumstances as you ruminate on your shortcoming.

Whatever the “would have’s”, “should have’s” and “could have’s” might be, in the final analysis on some level it’s your failure. Own it. Commit to doing better. Then move forward with your pride and the respect of others.


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257) The Hunchback Prince

Centuries ago, a kingdom had a prince with a hunchback. Though it was his destiny to be king, he was so tragically deformed that even the most loyal of subjects dreaded the day he would ascend to the throne.

Undeterred, the Prince ordered the royal sculptor to carve a statue of him in a manner that looked exactly as he would look if he had no deformity.

When the sculpture was finished, the Prince would approach it each day and try to bend his back straight up against the back of his statue. Then one day, bending upward, his shoulders touched the statute.  He now resembled the statue he’d ordered constructed.

Your life today is riddled with imperfection and deformities relative to where you want to take it. In your mind, carve a statute of your perfect future self. Then each day bend a little more towards it. Like the Prince, one day your imperfections will be cast aside.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.


Tips For Improving Small Talk

“Small Talk” is an art. Like any art, you can improve how you do it through practice. Here are some ideas for becoming more proficient at small talk.

  • THINK … On the way to the next event or when you have some idle time, work through in your mind how you envision your “small talk” going. Review the questions you will ask in your mind. See yourself listening, summarizing, and sharing.
  • LISTEN … “Small talk” is all around you, every day. Listen to it, especially those who are good at it. See how they weave from one question to the next and how they transition to business, return to small talk and then exit the conversation.
  • ENGAGE … Take every opportunity to engage in “small talk” When you are in line at the store check out. With a server in a restaurant. With the receptionist at your next appointment. You will find the more you engage in small talk, the more comfortable you get at it.

The most important thing you need to do to be good at “small talk” is develop an attitude of belief. Periodically, you need to tell yourself, “I can carry a conversation. I can. I am good at it. I enjoy it. I like how it lifts the spirits of others.  And I love what it is doing for my networking. I can carry a conversation.”


254) Ripples Of Goodness

Think of where you are in life right now. Okay, it’s not perfect. No one’s life is. But if you’re honest, you’ll admit, it’s pretty darn good.

And sure, you’ve worked hard, made smart moves and had a bit of luck. But much of the goodness you enjoy has been created by others. Somewhere in the past, the efforts and sacrifices of people you may or may not know have rippled forward to serve you. Creating opportunities. Establishing programs. Clearing a figurative path.

Now it’s your turn. It’s your turn to put forth effort and make sacrifice to benefit others.

  • Serve your family.
  • Serve your neighbors.
  • Serve your community.

It’s your turn to create your own ripples of goodness. Creating opportunities. Establishing programs. Clearing a figurative path. Know this: The good you do today never dies. It rolls forward. It lives on. In other people, in other places and throughout time. Your good deeds live on forever.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.


253) Be Genuinely Happy For Others

This world has more than its share of envy and jealousy. None of this serves anyone. So, resist those feelings as they simply position you with the masses.

Rather, be extraordinary. Find it in your heart to be truly happy for others.

If someone gets a raise or promotion, become giddy for them as if it were your own.

When they get that great house, the one even better than yours, smile for them as they no doubt earned it.

When they find true love, share in their joy and let it warm your soul too.

After all, envy and jealousy will rob you of vital energy. But sharing in the joy of others will serve to lift you and stoke your passion.

Remember, the good fortune of others doesn’t diminish your opportunity for it. Rather it provides a beacon of hope that goodness is out there for you too.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.


252) Contact Classification, Easy As 1-2-3-4

In his book, Who Do You Want To Meet, author Rob Thomas offers a simple way to classify your network. The purpose of this is to ensure that you make the highest and best use of your time in cultivating relationships: Start by rating your list of contacts on a scale one to four.

  • Ones are individuals with whom you are newly connected.
  • Twos are people you know. But these are people who you’ve had no real contact with for some time. The relationship is there, but it’s dormant until one of you takes action.
  • Threes are those connections where there is an active relationship, but the benefits are generally one sided. Either you’re doing things for them and them not reciprocating or vice versa. And…
  • Fours are those relationships that are mutually beneficial.

With this classification in hand, you’ll know best how to invest time and energy in your relationships. Plus, you’ll have a great understanding of how you can work to improve your network.  


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250) Focus on What You Can Control

Let’s face it. Everyone’s life is full of uncertainty. There is no guarantee of business, employment or income. Any or all of that can be gone tomorrow.

Additionally, no one can say how their health will hold. Illness or worse can come out of nowhere. And every day, you’re getting a little older, increasing the likelihood.

And you can’t control the growth or dimension of your connections. People move. They retire. Allegiances change. Your network is prone to shift. That’s just life.

In short, you cannot be sure as to how anything will turn out. All you can do is double down on the things you can control. And all you can really control is your mindset and the effort you put forth.

So, work hard at whatever you aspire to and maintain a hopeful and positive attitude as you do. Focus on these things and then just let the chips fall where they may.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.