179) It’s Just A Patch

Setbacks are part of life, right?

Some are big, some are small and a good many are in between.

  • You’ll have relationships that go sideways.
  • Your best laid plans simply won’t work out.
  • That promotion won’t come through.
  • A raise will be smaller than expected.
  • A great opportunity will just disappear.
  • A client will refuse to pay an invoice.
  • A vendor will hit you with a larger than expected bill.
  • The water heater will fail.
  • Your car won’t start.

And at times, it feels like all of this is hitting at once and the whole darn world is conspiring against you. It’s easy to get down. Don’t.

Take a moment to gather yourself. Remind yourself that setbacks happen. Keep working hard. Stay optimistic. This is not your new place in life. This is merely a patch you need to work through.


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178) Don’t Monopolize

There is no doubt that you’re interesting. How you came to this place in life is likely intriguing. Your personal life is full of engaging stories. You’re a tremendous reservoir of useful information and insightful opinions.  And there is much you can say about what you do and how you do it.

That said, as interesting as you certainly are, you aren’t so interesting that what you have to say should consume the entire subject matter of a conversation. After all, no one is that interesting.

When you get into conversations with others, don’t just talk about yourself. Keep it interesting. Talk about you, talk about them and talk about others.

At the very worst, you should have an equal split between what you say and what you hear. Because, ironically, the more you talk about you, the less you appear to have to offer.


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177) 30,000 People Can’t Be Wrong

In 2003, a group of researchers embarked on an ambitious, multi-year study involving over 30,000 households across the United States.

Among the many things that this team was trying to determine was what impact additional income had on people’s generosity. What the researchers were able to determine was that for every additional dollar of income, households contributed on average 14 more cents. That’s no big revelation, right?

Remember, however, this study spanned multiple years. So, the researchers were also able to look at the impact that generosity had on household income. What they found was stunning. For every dollar of additional contribution, household earnings grew on average a whopping $3.74.

What the researchers clearly showed is that being generous, while serving to help others, will somehow help you too. Knowing this, the question shouldn’t be, “Should I be helping others?” but rather, “How can I help others?”


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176) Become A Copy Cat

Do you want to become better at networking? Sure, you do. Everyone wants to become more proficient at connecting with others and building productive relationships in their life. From these relationships come other great contacts, referrals, information, opportunities, and the list goes on.

Now, if you’re at a loss as to how you can become better at networking, here’s a surefire means of learning:

Find someone who is already successful and figure out what they do. After all, successful people got where they are via building productive relationships. And they likely have networking insights that will push you up the learning curve.

Ask for a few minutes of their time so you can inquire as to how they build relationships.

And when you see them in public or at events, observe them. Watch how they interact.

The bottom line is this: Don’t reinvent the wheel, rather copy someone else’s.


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175) Four Eighteen

In 2002, Principia College receiver Lewis Howes had a reasonable goal for each game: Accumulate at least 100 receiving yards. And with hard work and determination, he achieved this goal in every game.

During one game, however, Howes hit his goal in the first quarter. His team needed it, though. Principia was in a “dog fight” against rival Martin Luther College.

So, Lewis kept going. To keep pace with their opponent, he accumulated another 100 yards. And then another 100. And then 100 yards one more time. When the dust had settled on the game, Lewis Howes had recorded a total of 418 yards, which was an NCAA record in all divisions for years and years.

The lesson is this: Set worthwhile goals and work hard to achieve them. And once you do, keep going. Chances are someone out there needs you to.


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174) Ask To Assist

Networking is about giving – doing things for people around you. From this, people want to know you. Chances are, they can’t help but come to like you. And, with these two things, their trust in you will grow. In short, through helping others your relationship builds.

To this end, look for ways to help your network. To empower this, make a habit of inquiring of your network how you can assist them. Probe with questions, like:

“Who would you like to meet?”

“What opportunities are you looking for?”

“What are some challenges you currently face?”

Or

“How can I assist you in meeting your goals?”

If you consistently do this, in time you’ll find that others will be attracted to you. But they won’t just be interested in getting from you; they will also be interested in helping you too.


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173) Finish Things

Leaving high school before completing leaves you short of a diploma. Dropping out of the marathon at mile 22 leaves you with the designation of “Did Not Finish.” Getting a bathroom remodel 90 percent complete leaves you only with an angry spouse.

In life, it’s not a matter of what you start. Rather, you’ll be judged by what you finish.

Yes, it’s great to have many proverbial “irons in the fire” and it’s good to be diversified by having lots of things underway. But it’s equally important to see things through. In short, there’s tremendous value in bringing things to completion.

So, from time to time ask yourself, “Am I just busy doing things or am I focused on getting things done?”

Remember to take the time to knock things off your list and not just add things to it.


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172) Know The Three P’s

In developing your professional relationships, over time you need to create a mutual sense of “knowing.” 

This, however, cannot be limited to others only knowing who you are and what you do.  And, likewise, you need to know more than just these things about the other person.

This “knowing” must encompass all aspects of the three P’s:

The first “P” is Past Information: Where they are from? Where they went to school?

The second “P” is Personal Lives: What is their marital status? Do they have children? What hobbies or interests do they have?

The final “P” is Professional Background: What did they study? What degrees and licenses do they have? Who have they worked for? What are the unique experiences or specialties that they have? 

It is upon this “knowing” that the entire relationship is built, so it’s best you invest some time into it.


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171) The Subsequent Steps

Let’s be honest. There is no shortage of ideas. They are simply easy to come by. They happen in the shower. And they’ll hit you while you’re mowing the lawn, vacuuming the house, and commuting in traffic. Ideas are downright easy.

What’s hard is getting started. The first few words of your book idea can be a chore. Making the first pitch on that new initiative you’ve concocted is frightening. The first step of any journey can seem daunting.

Yes, the first step is the hardest part. But the most important steps are all the ones that come after the that. The first one gets you moving, but the ones after that create momentum. And it’s this momentum that helps you see things through.

In fact, without these subsequent steps, your effort on the hardest part is wasted.

So, to achieve on any idea, get started and keep stepping.


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170) Express Quiet Confidence

People love passion. They love enthusiasm. They are drawn to it. They feed off it. It actually inspires them to become a better version of themselves.

Therefore, a great way to help build your network is to carry yourself in a manner that exudes enthusiasm as to who you are, what you do, as well as what you stand for.  

This, however, doesn’t mean to demonstrate this passion you have to be loud, animated, excited or gregarious. In fact, in extremes these attributes can be off-putting and detrimental. But even at reasonable levels these characteristics are unnecessarily.

Rather enthusiasm and passion are best conveyed by how you carry yourself. You need only exhibit a confident and optimistic demeanor that subtly whispers, “I believe in who I am and what I can do.” If you consistently do this, your passion and enthusiasm will come through loud and clear. 


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