367) The Fiesta Fake Out

The Fiesta Fake Out

In 2009, Dane Ebanez (e-bon-ez) walked onto the University of Oregon football team with little expectation of ever playing in a game. After all, he was only 5’9” and weighed a modest 180 pounds.

Despite being virtually anonymous, Ebanez was an active member of the team. He attended hundreds of film sessions and practices. He toiled day in and day out on the scout team. He spent hours studying and executing plays of Oregon’s opponents.

And, while Ebanez thought no one noticed his efforts, someone did. In 2013 when Oregon had the Fiesta Bowl in hand, a teammate who knew of his commitment, ensured Ebanez’s hard work was rewarded. He found an opportunity for the walk-on to slip into the game for one play.

The lesson is this: Work hard at whatever you do. And find opportunities to sacrifice, even if you think no one is noticing. Chance are, someone is. And your reward is coming.


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256) Standing O-H … I-O

Towards the end of the 1940 Michigan-Ohio State football game, Buckeye fans in attendance at Ohio Stadium made a standing ovation. That is not uncommon for a football program such as the Ohio State University. It’s an enthusiastic crowd and they often show their appreciation for a great performance.

This particular ovation, however, was for the opponent’s star player. You see, Michigan’s Tom Harmon almost single-handedly delivered a 40 to nothing loss on the Buckeyes.

No doubt you have competitors. Some of them might even rise to the level of being rivals. Great. If done the right way, this is healthy, as it serves to make you better and it collectively heightens the level of service in the entire business community.

In summary, great people applaud the achievement of others, even if they are competitors. So, when you see or learn of a remarkable performance in your professional world, don’t be afraid to let the person know. Recognizing them serves to make you a great person too.


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