184) Giving Never Gets Old

The joy you get from helping others never really fades.

In a study, researchers gave approximately 100 participants five dollars per day for five days. Randomly, half the participants were instructed to spend the windfall on themselves, each day purchasing the same thing, like a great cup of coffee or a snack.

The other half were instructed to use their daily money to benefit another in a consistent fashion, like a leaving an extraordinarily tip or a donation.

Throughout the process, the researchers measured the level of happiness the participants felt relative to their daily habit of spending or giving. While the happiness of the spenders dropped as the experiment wore on, the happiness of the givers held firm.

Helping others is a joyful thing, for you and the person you’re helping. And it’s good to know that as you endeavor to help those around you, that joyful feeling will never really get old.


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183) A Thing Called Guts!

American author Louis Adamic wrote in his 1944 essay A Study In Courage

“There is a certain blend of courage, integrity, character and principle which has no satisfactory dictionary name, but has been called different things at different times in different countries. Our American name for it is “guts.”

America has been called “The Land of Opportunity.” While that is arguably still true, opportunity in and of itself is not enough.

To see opportunity through takes a strong character, one that can create a bold vision that others can clearly see and contribute to. It requires establishing principles that guide individual efforts and interaction with others.

It needs a commitment to integrity, so the right things are done especially when others aren’t doing them. To see opportunity through necessitates the courage to work tirelessly even when a successful outcome is not clear.

No, opportunity alone is not enough. To see it through takes guts.


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How Does “Small Talk” Create Networking Bonds?

How Does “Small Talk” Create Networking Bonds?

Think about it. What did you do that last time you were at an event and someone started talking “Brass Tacks” ASAP. “Who does your printing? Are you happy? I can do better. Give me a chance. Throw me some business. Well, why not?”

It is through “small talk” that people gain an understanding of: Who you are … What interests you … How you spend your time. And you learn the same about them.

As an analogy, “small talk” is like the warm-up you do before you really get into the work out. It is the foundation of the KNOWING in “Know, Like & Trust”. It is also this small foundation upon which people gain a sense as to whether they LIKE you. In fact, social science and brain studies have shown that in the few minutes where chitchat is happening, people even start to formulate a sense as to whether or not they TRUST you, too.

From Small Talk To Networking Success

Let’s face it … “small talk” has a bad reputation. It probably dates back to the continual chiding our mothers did relative to talking with strangers.

While her warnings were intended to protect us as children from those who would prey on our innocence, we are no longer kids. We are big boys and girls … We operate in the grown-up world where strangers become good friends, great clients and, even reliable vendors.

Even still, however, “small talk” gets a bad rap. Far too often people see it as idle chitchat that has no productive value in the professional world.

Understand this, our entire personal and professional worlds are formed and held firmly together by networking … And “small talk” has a big part in successful networking.

Mining Networking Events

Networking events are generally not opportunities for closing business. Thus, you may not likely get clients as a result of them. You may stumble upon a client. Know, however, that is the exception rather than the rule.

As you embark upon networking at events, do not consume yourself with meeting as many people as you can. Remember, meaningfully connecting is about the quality of the connection and not the quantity. You are much further ahead in time to focus on really connecting with a small handful of people rather than simply collecting dozens of business cards.

Remember, networking events are everywhere. Business after-hours are networking events. Tradeshows are networking events. Business parties are networking events … so are social parties, tailgates, and really any gathering of people. Use each to expand your base of connections, from which you build relationships.

Was That Networking Event Worthwhile?

The burning question after most any networking event is “Was that worthwhile?”

In reality, the answer is “Absolutely!”. After all, every event offers value. Some offer more immediate value than others. They all have value, however.

Track your results however you deem appropriate. Before you completely pass judgment on an event, however, remember that the benefits of any networking activity may not present themselves for weeks, months, or even years.

Don’t Foul Up The Follow Up

Networking events are wonderful. The conversations can be exhilarating. And the whole experience productive. Follow Up or Follow Through regarding whatever you promised to.

If you pledged to reconnect, do so. If you offered to introduce them, make it happen. If you indicated you would send them something, get it sent.

Know this, so few people follow through on what they say they are going to do. That is a sad, but true fact. Given that, if you are committed to doing so, you immediately elevate yourself ahead of a significant portion of the networking population.

Building A Networking Relationship 5 of 7

Building A Networking Relationship 5 of 7

Getting people to “Know, Like, and Trust” you is dependent upon human interaction. Remember, however, your network (or any network, for that matter) is built one relationship at a time.

There is an Indian proverb that says, “An eagle that chases two rabbits, catches none.” This is true of relationships as well. You will not be able to develop lasting Know, Like, and Trust if you are focused on multiple relationships at any one time. In fact, the more relationships you attempt to develop at once, the less effective you become.

The point to this topic is this: As you are out being involved, do not feel the need to race about meeting as many people as possible … having quick, shallow conversations … collecting business cards and then haphazardly following up with a plethora of people you can hardly remember.

Rather work to have involved conversations with just a few people (and then attend another gathering and do the same). Learn about people. Invest time in who they are. Be genuinely interested. Conduct yourself so that when you follow up, you can do so with substance.

By working to develop relationships one person at a time, you become more effective at developing relationships. In short, people will Know, Like, and Trust you.

Building A Networking Relationship 4 of 7

Building A Networking Relationship 4 of 7

An often overlooked means of getting people to “Know, Like, and Trust” you is Getting Involved.

To be successful in any business or profession, you cannot just hole-up in front of your computer and work the phone. You need to shower up, brush your teeth, and get out amongst people. Find groups and organizations to join.

Know this, however, you cannot just belong. You cannot just be in the community. You cannot just be in the Chamber. You cannot just be part of the Church. You cannot just belong.

To effectively network … to develop strong relationships … to build Know, Like, and Trust, you have to get involved. Roll up your sleeves (actually or figuratively) and lend a hand. Be an officer in a group. Be a committee member of an organization. Be something (anything) more than just a name on a membership roster.

Here is the test as to whether you are sufficiently involved – Answer this: If you didn’t show up, would you be missed?

If the answer is no, you need to work harder to get involved. By doing so, you raise your level of exposure and demonstrate your level of commitment to something more than just you. When you do these things, others will not be able to help but Know, Like, and Trust you.

Building A Networking Relationship 3 of 7

Building A Networking Relationship 3 of 7

If you want people to “Know, Like, and Trust” you remember There Is No Shame In Asking: Call it “human nature” or call it the “American Spirit,” but we are hardwired to help one another. Certainly the aftermath of the events of September 11th (or any major tragedy) make this abundantly clear. People will go to great lengths to help one another.

With this, the only thing that separates you from the help that you need is you asking. Dare to ask. Remember, if you are focused on giving and helping others, it is only fair that you attempt to partake from the same process.

  • Let others know what kind of help you want.
  • Describe the types of people you are trying to meet.
  • Explain to your centers of influence how they can help you.
  • Solicit people for information on job transition groups or opportunities to present on the benefits of franchising. 

Understand this, if you are polite in asking of others and appreciative of whatever they give (even if it is only time), people will come through. Not everyone, but enough to make it all worthwhile. Equally important, however, when you reach out to others, you are in essence affirming that they have value to offer. It is a wonderful compliment. For that, they will be flattered. As backwards as it might seem, they will Know, Like, and Trust you for reaching out to them.