LinkedIn Active Use 3 of 4

The third active use of LinkedIn is to add value by contributing content. Think for a moment about how you might conduct yourself at a traditional networking event. You stand around talking with people. You start discussions and you contribute to discussions that others have started. You answer questions that others ask, and you ask questions that you look for others to answer. LinkedIn provides this same opportunity for its users.

If you go into any of the groups you have joined, you will see that there are usually numerous discussions going on. Jump in and add value.

This does NOT mean pitch yourself or your product. It means share an opinion or insight. Offer a solution to a problem. Share your experience as it relates to the discussion.

In networking (whether traditional or online), adding value in this manner is critical to keeping you on the minds of others. People want to associate with those who add value, as they cannot help knowing, liking and trusting you.

LinkedIn Active Use 2 of 4

Being Active on LinkedIn is key. However, what if you feel woefully behind? “I haven’t done anything on LinkedIn and I’m connected to so few people. What’s the point of doing anything now?”

When others have tons of connections, activity and traction, it’s easy to have that “I will never catch up” feeling. Do not despair. There is a quick and easy way to “catch up” on LinkedIn. 

The second active use of LinkedIn is to take advantage of groups. Social media is nothing more than a giant networking event. Imagine that within this continually-running and information rich event there are rooms off to the side, each filled with people who all have a common bond or interest. Some are involved in small business or a particular company. Others live near each other or went to the same college. Or maybe it’s just a similar interest, such as marketing, engineering or accounting.

For the most part, these groups are highly welcoming and interested in new members. Find a few groups that interest you and join. Can’t find a group you want to be part of? Create your own! Here are a couple neat things about groups.

First, once you join, you are able to submit invitations to connect with people within the group. Normally on LinkedIn you can only do this with those you already know somehow. This is a great way to increase your connections if you are just getting started.

Second, once in a group, you are able to directly communicate with all group members, even if you’re not yet “connected”. Normally on LinkedIn you are only permitted to communicate with the people you are directly connected to. So, this is another way to expand your network and be seen by many people who may want to connect with you.

So, joining or starting groups and then interacting within them is a powerful active use of social media. 

Social Media: What Can It Do For Me?

Social media is a tool to help you network but it is not a replacement for networking. It is best analogized as a giant, ongoing, searchable networking event. Great! But the $64,000 question is “What Can It Do For Me?”

First, social media is an effective means of networking THROUGH to people. You can meet attorneys, bankers and those associated with employment transition. In short, social media is a great way to find and work through strategic partners who can lead you to clients. It is not geared for selling. Again, remember, it is just like a networking event and you would not dream of overtly hawking goods or services there, so do not do it here.

Second, social media is a wonderful way to position yourself in the hearts and minds of others, especially if you are new to a profession. Many of the people who know you, know you as someone else. Even if you have been in a particular profession for a long time, your online network might not fully appreciate what it means. LinkedIn provides you a platform to brand yourself as a knowledgeable and committed person in your profession (someone to know, like and trust). It will not do this over night, but in time you can create an expert of yourself on LinkedIn.

Finally, and likely of most interest, social media is a great means of creating opportunity. Through it, you can connect with people that can lead you to clients. Through it, you can find events that can lead you to clients. Through it, you can get information that can connect you to clients. Through it, clients can become aware of you and connect with you directly. It will not provide a windfall immediately; some days will be better than others. But over time the opportunities will be there.

Social Media As Compared To Traditional Networking

Everyone has been to a networking event … Business After-Hours, Open House or Tradeshow … A gathering of people with the ability to interact with each other. Do you know what? That is what social media is, nothing more than a networking event. It is just another networking event, EXCEPT for some important differences.

First, your average networking event might have a few hundred people all from a local area. Social media, however, boast having millions of people participating (and likely 100s of thousands in your region) and they are scattered all over the world.

Second, most networking events operate on a particular day and time. If you happen to be busy during that day and time (say, Friday at 7:30 am), you are out of luck until the next event. With LinkedIn, however, this networking event is going 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. During the big game you can participate in the event while you watch TV. If you can’t sleep, you can come online to the event. Even on Thanksgiving Day (or any other major holiday) you can be part of this continuously operating networking event.

Finally, when you walk into a networking event and see new faces, you cannot tell who is who. The guy in the suit could be a corporate executive or someone in transition. You just don’t know. If you are looking to network with attorneys, you generally find them via introduction or by trial and error. With social media (especially LinkedIn, in this instance), you can find the people you are looking for quickly and you can know a ton about them before you start to converse.

So approach social media as if it were just another networking event, but know that it also has the wonderful advantages of being worldwide and immense, continuously operating and rich with searchable information.

Networking Rx: Matt Ward – Care Packages (EPS 179)

Frank Agin, host of Networking Rx and founder of AmSpirit Business Connections, has a conversation with Matt Ward (speaker, author and consultant) about the concept of care packages. Learn more about Matt at https://breakthrough-champion.com/

http://networkingrx.libsyn.com/matt-ward-care-packages-eps-179

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://www.amspirit.com/franchise.php.

Networking Rx: Fixing Broken Windows (EPS 178)

Frank Agin, host of Networking Rx and founder of AmSpirit Business Connections, relates the social science concept of broken windows to professional relationships and business networking.

http://networkingrx.libsyn.com/fixing-broken-windows-eps-178

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://www.amspirit.com/franchise.php.

Networking Rx: Jordan Gross – Friends & Cloud Nine (EPS 175)

Frank Agin, host of Networking Rx and founder of AmSpirit Business Connections, has a conversation with author Jordan Gross about our cloud nine moments and how our networks contribute to them. Find Jordan’s book at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0815S6DY3?ref_=pe_3052080_276849420

http://networkingrx.libsyn.com/-jordan-gross-friends-cloud-nine-eps-175

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://www.amspirit.com/franchise.php.

Networking Rx: Smile Power (EPS 174)

Frank Agin, host of Networking Rx and founder of AmSpirit Business Connections, talks about the power and impact that smiling has on your networking presence.

http://networkingrx.libsyn.com/smile-power-eps-174

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://www.amspirit.com/franchise.php.

Networking Rx: Your Life And Networks Impact (EPS 172)

Frank Agin, host of Networking Rx and founder of AmSpirit Business Connections, explores an article by James Currier (@jamescurrier) on how your network gently guides your life. You can read Currier’s article at https://www.nfx.com/post/your-life-network-effects

http://networkingrx.libsyn.com/your-life-and-networks-impacts-eps-172

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://www.amspirit.com/franchise.php.

Creating A Referral Machine 5 of 7

Establishing relationships is an important first step. In so doing, you have built a network of people who are really behind you. Again, they know, like and trust you. This alone does not create a referral machine, however. Before your network can refer you, they need to be empowered. Empowered to recognize opportunities for you as well as empowered to talk or communicate about you.

People within your network do not magically know how to refer you. First, they need to know who to refer you to and they need to know when to refer you. To make this happen, it is entirely up to you to empower them to recognize these opportunities.

Consider franchise brokerage (though this applies to any business or profession). Certainly if someone comes out and says, “I am looking to buy a franchise”, your network should know to think of and refer you. But what about all the times that someone could be a great client but does not say they are looking to buy a franchise (or they do not even know that franchise ownership is an option)?

EXAMPLES:

  • What about the person whose spouse is looking to have their own business?
  • What about the displaced executive who might not be interested in getting back into the grind?
  • What about the mid-level manager that wants a way out of the grind?

If you want to create a referral machine, it is your job to paint a picture in the minds of your network as to who is a good referral candidate and what is a good situation. Here are three great ways to do this.

(1) Develop a series of short 30-second commercials that concisely convey what you are looking for and what you do. Again, develop a series, so that you have a varied message. Write these out and practice them, then use them as often as possible. For help on this find the short series on 30-second commercials.

(2) Even if you have a great 30-second commercial, people are not going to fully remember what you have to say. To overcome this, develop (again) a series of short summaries outlining what you are looking for. Make these short and simple (so simple that a 5th grader could understand them). Then neatly type and print them out (or even have them professionally printed) so you can quickly and easily hand them out, mail, or e-mail them to your network.

(3) If you give people the basic facts, they might politely listen. But if you weave these facts within a compelling story, example or analogy, they will be enthralled by what you have to say. If you have experiences, share them. If you do not have experiences, then talk to someone who does and borrow theirs. If you have neither experience nor access to someone who does, make it up. In this situation, it is not stealing to make someone else’s experiences your own. It is not lying to craft a story that has not occurred. You are doing this to paint a picture of what a good referral looks like.

In Part 6, we will address empowering your referral machine.