410) The Leading Edge Of Branding

410) The Leading Edge Of Branding

If you’re an entrepreneur, sales representative or professional, no doubt a business card is part of your daily attire. That is, you feel a sense of anxiety – just like when you forget your phone – when you don’t have an ample supply of cards to share with that next prospective client or strategic business partner.

Your business card, however, is not just a functional component of doing business day in and day out. Done right, it’s also an integral part of your corporate identity strategy. Most times, it’s the first visual impression you make about your professional image.

For that reason, it’s important that you invest in a business card design that represents your brand well. In addition, be sure to coordinate it with other aspects of your visual brand, such as letterhead, envelopes and brochures, as well as your website and social media.

Let your business card be the leading edge of your corporate identity.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.

395) Social Media Success

Social Media Success

Social media … like LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter … has created a whole new experience for networking. Now, if you’re looking to find success networking on social media, there is no magic. There are no secret formulas or short cuts. The key is to follow these three important steps.

One – get your account set up or, if you’re already set up, expand your usage to be more effective. Two – schedule time to take a little action each day. And three – commit to keeping after it.

Yep, it’s that simple. Sure, there is a lot there and much to master and learn. Nothing, however, says you need to climb the learning curve in one day, one month or even one year. Even the most proficient users of social media find that they are continually learning new things.

Besides, no one is judging you on your proficiency using social media. They are only judging you on the value you bring. So, get started.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.

165) Networking And Social Media

Networking and Social Media

While there was a day that some proclaimed the Internet as just a fad, others re-tooled it. They took a novel approach and made it so that we could all not just see it but contribute to it too.

We know this as Social Media, and it has completely shifted how you can discover and share news, information and other content.

Certainly, social media gets a bad rap as an expansive online rumor mill or coffee club. If you approach it correctly, however, it can be a valuable networking tool for connecting and communicating with others. While you should not spend countless hours reading idle chit-chat from others, you should make time each day to learning from others and contributing to them as well.

No, the Internet is not a passing fad. But you just might be if you don’t learn to utilize its potential.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.

296) A Daily Dose Of Social Media

A Daily Dose of Social Media

To successfully engage yourself in social media (such as LinkedIn, Facebook or Twitter), you only need to devote about 100 hours per year to it. When you put it that way, the task seems insurmountable.

Here is the reality: That translates to only about 20 minutes a day or a couple hours scattered over the course of a week. Now, that doesn’t seem so bad, does it? Think about it.

  • In the morning, while enjoying a cup of coffee, you might tinker with your profile.
  • Another day take a mid-morning break and interact within one of the groups you’ve joined.
  • Then, at some point during the week, while waiting for dinner to warm up (or arrive), jump into a discussion.
  • Finally, when there is a break in the action from the big game you are watching, share an update.

Remember, social media is like a networking vitamin. Be sure to get your daily dose of it.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.

Networking Activities

Networking Activities

Networking activities take place every day and everywhere. These networking activities fall into three distinct categories: Face To Face, Electronic Encounters, and Social Media.

Face To Face:

Face to face networking takes place when you are out and about with people. There are different formats for meeting face to face.

  • Structured Networking: This includes organizations such as Toastmasters, Rotary, Lions Club, or organizations like AmSpirit Business Connections.
  • Networking Events: These are generally trade shows, volunteer activities, business after-hours, Chamber events, seminars, and even social events like tailgates.
  • Free-Form Networking: More casual in nature, these include a round of golf, meeting over a cup of coffee, or just an impromptu get-together.
Electronic Encounters:

With respect to networking in the modern age, much of what you can do face to face, you can accomplish via ELECTRONIC ENCOUNTERS. More specifically, you network over the phone, by email, and through texting. Remember networking is more than selling and prospecting. It is two or more people working towards their mutual benefit. That is sharing referrals or contacts, passing on information, being encouraging and supportive.

Social Media:

Finally, in the 21st century, technological innovation has given way to social media websites. These are nothing more than virtual venues where you can network. Again, places where you can share referrals or contacts, pass on information or be encouraging and supportive.

The three main social media applications are LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. Beyond these are dozens and dozens of others. Used properly, social media allows you to network on a massive scale. You are connected worldwide 24 hours a day / seven days a week. And you can be prepared with incredible information about your networking partner before you even make contact.

Whichever networking activities you choose to participate in, remember to Give First, Get Second and that Every Contact Has Opportunity.


Learn more about networking and AmSpirit Business Connections at www.amspirit.com

Social Media Success

There are three important steps to success on social media. There is no magic. There are no secret formulas or short cuts. The key is to follow these three important steps.

  1. Get Started (or expand your usage to be more effective)
  2. Make time to take a little action each day
  3. Commit to keeping after it

Admittedly, when it comes to social media there is a lot there and much to master and learn. There is nothing, however, that says you need to climb the learning curve in one day, one month or even one year. Even the most proficient users of social media find that they are continually learning new things.

Besides, no one is judging you on your proficiency using social media. They are only judging you on the value you bring to the network. 

A Daily Dose Of Social Media

To successfully engage yourself in social media (this immensely-large, continuously running and information-rich networking event), you only need to devote about 100 hours per year to it.

Now, when you put it that way, the task may seem insurmountable. Here is the reality, however: This translates to only about 20 minutes a day or a couple hours scattered over the course of a week. That does not seem so bad.

In the morning, when you are enjoying a cup of coffee, you might tinker with your profile.

Another day, you take a mid-morning break and interact within one of the groups you’ve joined.

Then, at some point during the week, while you are waiting for dinner to warm up (or arrive) you jump into a discussion or answer a question.

Finally, when there is a break in the action from the big game you are watching, Share An Update.

It is important to note that there are websites and applications available that will empower you to be more effective interacting and sharing information. While those are beyond the scope of this program, a quick search online and you will find plenty.

LinkedIn Active Use 4 of 4

The final active use of LinkedIn is taking advantage of the “Share An Update” feature, where you can report what you are doing, what’s on your mind or what you would like others to know.

Found on your home page of LinkedIn, this is an underutilized feature that can be used in one of three general ways.

  • Mini Press Release: Imagine having a publicist. Someone who tracked your every move and reported it to the world like some Hollywood star. Well, with LinkedIn, you can. Using the Share An Update feature you can share on your profile the things you are doing. This can enlighten others on your activity (personally or professionally) … Who you know … What you are working on.
  • Add Value: As we discussed earlier, adding value is important whether you are networking in a traditional manner or via LinkedIn. People simply want to associate with those that have something to offer – it is purely human nature. Using the Share An Update, you can provide value to your LinkedIn network by offering information, sharing insight or simply making alerts.
  • Evoke Discussion: Finally, just like contributing content, you can use the Share An Update feature to gain information quickly or simply engage your network. This activity creates interaction and interaction generally leads to value. So think about engaging your online network by asking a question, soliciting feedback, or creating a forum for discussion.

LinkedIn Active Use 1 of 4

Q: If you went to a networking event, grabbed a chair and sat along the wall, what would you expect to gain from the experience?

A: NOTHING!!! To make the event work for you, you need to get out and interact with people. LinkedIn is much the same. You can expect nothing from it, unless you put something into it. You need to make active use of it. There are five basic active uses of LinkedIn. The first is the professional profile.

Just like when you head to the networking event, you need to not only be visible, but you need to put your best foot forward. On LinkedIn, you have the ability to create a profile for yourself. This is your face in the crowd at this online networking event. Be sure to take the time to present yourself well.

Note that this essentially is an electronic resume or brochure for you.

  • Don’t be shy; add a picture
  • Provide a short statement of not just your title, but the value you offer
  • Give a 30-Second Commercial-like overview of what you are about
  • Share your work experience (listing anything that is reasonably relevant)
  • Provide an overview of your education (as this will lend credibility to you as well as being a point of common experience or affiliation with others)
  • Include some recommendations on the work you have done for and with others
  • List impressive achievements and other experiences that might not come through in your work history (such as professional designations, awards and recognition)

The great thing about this profile is that there is no limit to how often you can revise it. So feel free to keep it up to date with whatever you are doing, producing or reading. Allow people to know as much as reasonably possible about you.

Social Media: What Can It Do For Me?

Social media is a tool to help you network but it is not a replacement for networking. It is best analogized as a giant, ongoing, searchable networking event. Great! But the $64,000 question is “What Can It Do For Me?”

First, social media is an effective means of networking THROUGH to people. You can meet attorneys, bankers and those associated with employment transition. In short, social media is a great way to find and work through strategic partners who can lead you to clients. It is not geared for selling. Again, remember, it is just like a networking event and you would not dream of overtly hawking goods or services there, so do not do it here.

Second, social media is a wonderful way to position yourself in the hearts and minds of others, especially if you are new to a profession. Many of the people who know you, know you as someone else. Even if you have been in a particular profession for a long time, your online network might not fully appreciate what it means. LinkedIn provides you a platform to brand yourself as a knowledgeable and committed person in your profession (someone to know, like and trust). It will not do this over night, but in time you can create an expert of yourself on LinkedIn.

Finally, and likely of most interest, social media is a great means of creating opportunity. Through it, you can connect with people that can lead you to clients. Through it, you can find events that can lead you to clients. Through it, you can get information that can connect you to clients. Through it, clients can become aware of you and connect with you directly. It will not provide a windfall immediately; some days will be better than others. But over time the opportunities will be there.