375) Goal Sharing

Goal Sharing

There is little argument that goal setting is vital to success. It works in sports. It works in business. It works relative to personal finances. Goals are the road to achievement.

But often overlooked, and certainly underappreciated, is goal sharing. As sports psychologist Grant Parr shares in his book, The Next One Up Mindset:

“You need to be willing to share your goals with others. To tell your friends and family, coaches and bosses about them so that there will be someone else out there who will help hold you accountable. Without accountability, goals are meaningless.”

Parr offers sage advice. Having a goal is great. But its complete and total effectiveness only happens when you have the courage to let someone else know about it. With that simple act, you become vulnerable, to be sure. But it’s that vulnerability that will inspire you to press on when you otherwise might not.

You’ve got goals, right? Share them with someone.


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372) Out Of The Mindset Slump

Out Of The Mindset Slump

Dr. Rob Bell, podcast host and sports psychologist offers three ways to upgrade your mindset and pull out of the funk of feeling bad about yourself.   

One, change your environment. Whether it’s a full-on vacation, a mini stay-cation or simply changing where you sit, altering your environment can serve to provide a mental health re-boot.

Two, evaluate your relationships. Actively build into your life relationships with people who “get you”; people who, no matter what, make you feel good about yourself. And,

Three, hang out with winners. Bell makes the point that in baseball dugouts those hitting well hang out with others who are hitting well. Metaphorically, who’s hitting well in your life? Get in their dugout. Remember, you are the average of the five people closest to you. So, make sure your environment breeds success and supports you!

Any (or all) of these tips will get you out of the mindset slump.


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282) Poised, Confident and Focused

Poised, Confident and Focused

In his book The Next One Up Mindset: How To Prepare For The Unknown, mental performance coach Grant Parr shared that throughout much of his high school and collegiate football playing career he had the habit of writing the letters “P, C and F” on his taped wrist.

The letters stood for poised, confident and focused. These served as a constant reminder, whether he was a starter or riding the bench, that he shouldn’t lament what isn’t, nor should he get consumed with the chaos around him. Rather, he should remain entirely focused on being ready to do his best when his moment arrived.

Parr shares that insight with both his athlete and corporate clients. You might not be a starter or have the best professional situation. None of that, however, stands in the way of getting yourself ready so that when your moment arrives, you can deliver your best performance. Poised, Confident and Focused!


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333) Your Ally, Pressure

Your Ally, Pressure

Lots of things go into success. One, however, that is seldom mentioned is pressure. To achieve anything, you need to take your abilities to that edge. You know. The one where the situation makes you sit up straight, focus a bit more, and your heart gets racing. It makes you feel alive. If you avoid this sensation, you risk getting stuck in mediocrity.

In his book, The Next One Up Mindset, mental edge guru Grant Parr shares, “If we learn to prepare and train our minds, we too can come to love pressure and use it to our advantage. After all, we mostly create our own pressure.”

Parr is right. Everyone creates their own pressure. The difference is that some allow it to cripple them. Others use it to catapult them forward. If you want success bad enough, learn to have pressure be a catapult for you. Learn to love it. Embrace it. Make pressure your ally, not your enemy.