A Basic Introduction

A Basic Introduction

Your 30-second commercial is your first connection with a potential new client or member of your network. As such, it is an essential part of your networking efforts. At just 30 short seconds, it’s an efficient way to convey important information. In order to also be effective, your message must be concise and include only your basic information. One of the most basic elements of your 30-second commercial is who you are. This is your Basic Introduction.

There is no magic to stating who you are in your Basic Introduction. After all, it is, well, basic. Nevertheless, this part of the 30-second commercial is important.

In your Basic Introduction you need to clearly articulate your name (is it Mike or Michael? … Kim or Kimberly?). Then state your title and the work you are associated with. Each of these is important.

Now, nothing says it has to be in this precise order. You could achieve the same objective by phrasing your Basic Introduction as:

  • “I am a franchise broker with National Franchising Group. My name is John Doe.” Or…
  • “I am with National Franchising Group. My name is John Doe, and I am a franchise broker.” Or…
  • “I’m John Doe, a franchise broker with National Franchising Group.”

Whatever the case, your 30-second commercial must address who you are.

Framework for an Effective 30-Second Commercial

Framework for an Effective 30-Second Commercial

Regardless of your objective (to inform or to grow your network), it’s helpful to have a framework for an effective 30-second commercial. First, let’s look at two types of 30-second commercials:

  • The kind you use to inform, like when someone you meet at a social event or other gathering asks, “What do you do?”
  • The kind you use to help grow your professional network, like when you’re at a networking event.

To build a strong network that gives you referrals, contacts, and information, you need to have a concise, yet very compelling, 30-second commercial. The 30-second commercial framework below is helpful when meeting other professionals that you might want to include in your network. The problem is that you have SO MUCH to say, and 30 seconds is not a lot of time. To conquer the challenge of conveying lots of information in a short period of time, give this framework a try.

  • Start with a basic Introduction for yourself (this addresses WHO you are)
  • Add to that a Message (which addresses WHAT you do)
  • From there, you need to Inspire Confidence or create credibility (which establishes WHY you over all the other choices)
  • Then wrap this up with a Strong Definite Request of what you need (this is the HOW they can help you).

Now, if you carefully draft each of these sub-parts and then piece them together with your own personal flair, you end up with a very effective 30-second commercial. Give it a try and see if this framework for an effective 30-second commercial works for you.

The Communication Challenge

The Communication Challenge

To build a network that will help you reach your goals, your network needs to KNOW you, LIKE you, and TRUST you. If you’ve known a person for many years, they probably already tick the boxes for all three areas. But what about when you’re meeting someone for the first time? How much information about yourself and your business should you share? And how can you do so in a relatively short amount of time? This is the communication challenge in networking.

As you begin to establish KNOW, LIKE & TRUST, those you hope to add to your network NEED (not just WANT, but NEED) to have a firm sense as to…

  • WHO you are – What’s your name? What’s your business name?
  • WHAT you do – Not a laundry list; just a general sense of the work you do.
  • WHY they should do business with you or WHY they should refer you to others as opposed to referring someone else.
  • And HOW they can help you – Who are people you want to be referred to? Who do you want to meet? What information do you need? 

In a networking environment, the primary limitation to communicating all this is simply ATTENTION SPAN. You only have somewhere around 30 seconds to effectively communicate all these things or risk losing their attention to something or someone else.

So, to tackle the communication challenge, plan out what you’re going to say, then practice saying it in 30 seconds or less.

David Braughler – Bringing Your Story To The World (EPS 288)

David Braughler shares about his journey to helping authors, executives and organizations tell their story through books, via his hybrid publishing company – Braughler Books. Reach him at david@braughlerbooks.com.

For more great insight on professional relationships and business networking visit https://www.amspirit.com/blog/ or contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com.

Check out this episode!

Michael Levitt – Rising From The Burnout (EPS 287)

Michael Levitt shares how he rose like a phoenix from a heart attack, job loss, car repossession, and home foreclosure in 369 days to a thriving business helping others avoid burnout. Learn more at https://www.breakfastleadership.com/

For more great insight on professional relationships and business networking visit https://www.amspirit.com/blog/ or contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com.

Check out this episode!

Diane Caine – Build Better Connections (EPS 286)

DISC Consultant and leadership development professional, Diane Caine shares how she conquered being an introvert and became a champion of leadership. Learn more at https://www.poweryourspark.com/

For more great insight on professional relationships and business networking visit https://www.amspirit.com/blog/ or contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com.

Check out this episode!

Expedition Networking: Dina Calakovic – Croatian Copywriter (EPS 285)

Supporting clients from all over the world, Croatia-based copywriter Dina Calakovic shares about helping organizations and businesses via her love of the English language. Learn more at https://tinyurl.com/y7w38plo

For more great insight on professional relationships and business networking visit https://www.amspirit.com/blog/ or contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com.

Check out this episode!

Tips For Improving Small Talk

Tips for Improving Small Talk

Small Talk is an art. Like any art, you can improve how you do it through practice. But it can be helpful to have some ideas for how to make small talk feel more comfortable and be more effective. Here are some tips for improving small talk.

  • THINK … On the way to an event (a party, meeting, or another social gathering) or when you have some idle time, work through in your mind how you envision your small talk going. Review in your mind the questions you will ask. Visualize yourself listening to the speaker, summarizing what they say, and sharing your own wisdom or experience.
  • LISTEN … Small talk is all around you, every day. Listen to it, especially when you notice someone who’s good at it. See how they flow from one question to the next and how they transition from small talk to business then back to small talk again before exiting the conversation.
  • ENGAGE … Take every opportunity to engage in small talk. When you are in line at the store check out. With a server in a restaurant. With the receptionist at your next appointment. You will find the more you engage in small talk, the more comfortable you get at it.

The most important thing you need to do to be good at small talk is developing an attitude of belief. Periodically, you need to tell yourself, “I can carry a conversation and I’m good at it. I enjoy how it lifts the spirits of others. And I love what it is doing for my networking. I can carry a conversation.” So at your next event try to use one or more of these tips for improving small talk.