A Daily Dose of Social Media

A Daily Dose of Social Media

To successfully engage yourself in social media (this immensely-large, continuously running and information-rich networking event), you only need to devote about 100 hours per year to it.

Now, when you put it that way, the task seems insurmountable. Here is the reality, however: This translates to only about 20 minutes a day or a couple hours scattered over the course of a week. That does not seem so bad.

  • In the morning, when you are enjoying a cup of coffee, you might tinker with your profile.
  • Another day, you take a mid-morning break and interact within one of the groups you’ve joined.
  • Then, at some point during the week, while you are waiting for dinner to warm up (or arrive) you jump into a discussion or answer a question.
  • Finally, when there is a break in the action from the big game you are watching, Share An Update.

It is important to note that there are websites and applications available that will empower you to be more effective interacting and sharing information. While those are beyond the scope of this program, a quick search online and you will find plenty.

Networking Rx: Ignorance On Fire (EPS 047)

Frank Agin, founder and president of AmSpirit Business Connections and host of Networking Rx, reminds us that taking action is most important, even if we don’t have all the answers.

http://networkingrx.libsyn.com/ignorance-on-fire-eps-047

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://networkingrx.libsyn.com/ignorance-on-fire-eps-047

LinkedIn Active Use 4 of 4

LinkedIn Use 4 of 4

The final active use of LinkedIn is taking advantage of the “Share An Update” feature, where you can report what you are doing, what’s on your mind or what you would like others to know.

Found on your home page of LinkedIn, this is an underutilized feature that can be used in one of three general ways.

Mini Press Release: Imagine having a publicist. Someone who tracked your every move and reported it to the world like some Hollywood star. Well, with LinkedIn, you can. Using the Share An Update feature you can share on your profile the things you are doing. This can enlighten others on your activity (personally or professionally) … Who you know … What you are working on.

Add Value: As we discussed earlier, adding value is important whether you are networking in a traditional manner or via LinkedIn. People simply want to associate with those that have something to offer – it is purely human nature. Using the Share An Update, you can provide value to your LinkedIn network by offering information, sharing insight or simply making alerts.

Evoke Discussion: Finally, just like contributing content, you can use the Share An Update feature to gain information quickly or simply engage your network. This activity creates interaction and interaction generally leads to value. So think about engaging your online network by asking a question, soliciting feedback, or creating a forum for discussion.

Networking Rx: Elevator Pitches as Easy as 3-1-3 (EPS 045)

Frank Agin, founder and president of AmSpirit Business Connections and host of Networking Rx, shares information on consultant Ryan Foland’s 3-1-3 method for communicating our elevator pitches.

http://networkingrx.libsyn.com/elevator-pitches-as-easy-as-3-1-3-eps-045

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://www.amspirit.com/franchise.php.

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LinkedIn Active Use 3 of 4

LinkedIn Active Use 3 of 4

The third active use of LinkedIn is to add value by contributing content. Think for a moment about how you might conduct yourself at a traditional networking event. You stand around talking with people. You start discussions and you contribute to discussions that others have started. You answer questions that others ask, and you ask questions that you look for others to answer. LinkedIn provides this same opportunity for its users.

If you go into any of the groups you have joined, you will see that there are usually numerous discussions going on. Jump in and add value.

This does NOT mean pitch yourself or your product. It means share an opinion or insight. Offer a solution to a problem. Share your experience as it relates to the discussion.

In networking (whether traditional or online), adding value in this manner is critical to keeping you on the minds of others. People want to associate with those who add value, as they cannot help knowing, liking and trusting you.

Networking Rx: Kanter’s Law (EPS 044)


Frank Agin, founder and president of AmSpirit Business Connections and host of Networking Rx, provides inspiration to keep you going as you embark on your initiative to grow and develop your network.

http://networkingrx.libsyn.com/kanters-law-eps-044

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://www.amspirit.com/franchise.php.

LinkedIn Active Use 2 of 4

LinkedIn Active Use 2 of 4

Being Active on LinkedIn is key. However, what if you feel woefully behind? “I haven’t done anything on LinkedIn and I’m connected to so few people. What’s the point of doing anything now?”

When others have tons of connections, activity and traction, it’s easy to have that “I will never catch up” feeling. Do not despair. There is a quick and easy way to “catch up” on LinkedIn.

The second active use of LinkedIn is to take advantage of groups. Social media is nothing more than a giant networking event. Imagine that within this continually-running and information rich event there are rooms off to the side, each filled with people who all have a common bond or interest. Some are involved in small business or a particular company. Others live near each other or went to the same college. Or maybe it’s just a similar interest, such as marketing, engineering or accounting.

For the most part, these groups are highly welcoming and interested in new members. Find a few groups that interest you and join. Can’t find a group you want to be part of? Create your own! Here are a couple neat things about groups.

First, once you join, you are able to submit invitations to connect with people within the group. Normally on LinkedIn you can only do this with those you already know somehow. This is a great way to increase your connections if you are just getting started.

Second, once in a group, you are able to directly communicate with all group members, even if you’re not yet “connected”. Normally on LinkedIn you are only permitted to communicate with the people you are directly connected to. So, this is another way to expand your network and be seen by many people who may want to connect with you.

So, joining or starting groups and then interacting within them is a powerful active use of social media.

Networking Rx: You Can’t Tickle Yourself (EPS 043)

Networking Rx: You Can’t Tickle Yourself (EPS 043)

Networking is about bringing joy to others by giving to them. In this episode, Frank Agin, founder and president of AmSpirit Business Connections, shares how we can ensure that this networking giving has its biggest impact.

http://networkingrx.libsyn.com/you-cant-tickle-yourself-eps-031

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://www.amspirit.com/franchise.php.

LinkedIn Active Use 1 of 4

LinkedIn Active Use 1 of 4

If you went to a networking event, grabbed a chair and sat along the wall, what would you expect to gain from the experience? A: NOTHING!!! To make the event work for you, you need to get out and interact with people. LinkedIn is much the same. You can expect nothing from it, unless you put something into it. You need to make active use of it. There are five basic active uses of LinkedIn. The first is the professional profile.

Just like when you head to the networking event, you need to not only be visible, but you need to put your best foot forward. On LinkedIn, you have the ability to create a profile for yourself. This is your face in the crowd at this online networking event. Be sure to take the time to present yourself well.

Note that this essentially is an electronic resume or brochure for you.

• Don’t be shy; add a picture

• Provide a short statement of not just your title, but the value you offer

• Give a 30-Second Commercial-like overview of what you are about

• List your work experience (listing anything that is reasonably relevant)

• Provide an overview of your education (as this will lend credibility to you as well as being a point of common experience or affiliation with others)

• Seek some recommendations on the work you have done for and with others

• List impressive achievements and other experiences that might not come through in your work history (such as professional designations, awards and recognition).

The great thing about this profile is that there is no limit to how often you can revise it. So feel free to keep it up to date with whatever you are doing, producing or reading. Allow people to know as much as reasonably possible about you.

Networking Rx: Trust Within Networking (EPS 041)

Networking Rx: Trust Within Networking (EPS 041)

Trust is one of the three quintessential elements of networking (Know-Like-Trust). As such, Frank Agin, founder and president of AmSpirit Business Connections and host of Networking Rx, gives us ideas on how to build and maintain trust in our networks.

http://networkingrx.libsyn.com/trust-within-networking-eps-030

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://www.amspirit.com/franchise.php.