273) Results Matter

Results Matter

In a 2019 issue of Success Magazine, Tony Jeary, also known as The Results Guy, shared his thoughts on how you can make the most out of any day. He indicates that it starts by being intentional relative to a few key things.

One, each day make a good to-do list that you’ll follow through on.

Two, become organized so that you know where things are on your desk, on your computer and throughout your office.

Three, schedule your time on your calendar. If something potentially intervenes, say NO to it, unless it’s a grave emergency or an incredible opportunity.

Finally, constantly audit yourself. Jeary encourages that at the end of each day you make an honest assessment. Ask yourself, “How did I do? Was I productive or simply consumed with busy work?”

He reminds us that activities that don’t lead to results are considered low leverage. These should be minimized, if not eliminated. Remember, activities don’t count. Only results matter.


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277) Don’t Talk Yourself Out of Networking

Don't Talk Yourself Out of Networking

On the one hand, networking is a perfectly natural thing. It’s merely interacting with others to create mutual benefits. It’s something that humans have been doing since we first walked the grassy plains of this planet.

On the other hand, networking in the modern world is vastly different than what our ancestors did. Eons ago, early humans lived within small tribes or clans of 150 people or so and seldom if ever encountered someone from outside their world.

So, while you’re hardwired to interact, it can also be naturally daunting to thrust yourself amongst total strangers. That said, you can’t live in the past. You have to work through any apprehension.  

Yes, often getting out and networking can seem like a daunting task. Do it anyway. Amongst those strangers before you are friends, valuable referral partners, clients, sources of information and much, much more.

Put your fear aside and capitalize on the opportunity.


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280) Subsequent Impressions

Subsequent Impressions

You’ve probably heard the saying, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” Certainly, it’s sage advice. The first impression you make with others is important. After all, you want to start any relationship, whether personal or professional, in a positive, impactful manner.

And while your first impression is important, what’s vital to a productive, long lasting relationship are the subsequent encounters. Think about it.

There have been times where someone has made a great first impression on you. They looked the part and said all the right things. But then the more you got to know them, the less you got to like or trust them.

In contrast, you’ve had times where the first encounter was off for whatever reason. But in a subsequent encounter, you sensed that your initial impression might have been inaccurate. And as time wore on, it got better and better.

Yes, make a good first impression. But also ensure that all subsequent encounters are as good or better.


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298) It’s All Personal

It's All Personal

If you’ve been out in the working world long enough, you’ve likely heard the phrase, “It’s not personal; it’s just business.” This phrase implies that when unpleasant things happen, you should push the emotion aside and move forward with an indifferent, “Oh well.”

Never use this phrase. Never rely on it to soften the tough realities that life sometimes requires. Why? Simple.

As humans, we each only have one brain. And while it’s an amazing thing, allowing us to talk and listen, the brain cannot differentiate between business and personal.

So, in business, when you must make a difficult decision that impacts others or deliver unpleasant news to someone, know this: The person affected feels it in a very personal way. That’s the only way their brain is capable of processing the impact.

None of this suggests avoiding these unpleasantries. To be successful, you can’t. What it does encourage, however, is that you handle them with empathy.


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303) Good Things In Bad

Good Things In Bad

You know it. There are times in life when experiences are good and other times when they’re bad. According to Be Connected author, Terry Bean, even when an experience is less than ideal, you need to learn to find the good in the bad experience.

To illustrate his point, Bean draws on the game of golf, saying: “There are 87 different ways to mess up a shot. If you look at your ball after you hit, you always find one good thing. Maybe it went 250 yards (and only 100 of them were the wrong way). Maybe it went straight as an arrow (even though it didn’t go very far). Focus on that and forget the rest. Why? Because negative energy doesn’t serve you well.”

Bean is right. Negative energy doesn’t fix anything. Rather, it generally serves to make things worse. So, with any less-than-ideal experience, find the good things in the bad and move forward to another shot.


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299) A Lifetime Of Happiness

A Lifetime of Happiness

There is a Chinese Proverb that goes: If you want happiness for an hour, take a nap. If you want happiness for a day, go fishing. If you want happiness for a month, get married. If you want happiness for a year, inherit a fortune. If you want happiness for a lifetime, help others.

There are so many ways for you to help others. Give them referrals. Introduce them to others. Share information with them. Listen to their challenges. Encourage them when they’re down. Celebrate their successes.

And there are so many ways helping others will bring you happiness. You’ll have people to give you referrals. As you introduce them, they’ll want to introduce you. They have insightful information that will benefit you too. They have ears that’ll be open to hear your troubles. When you’re down, they’ll spur you on. And when you achieve, they’ll cheer loudest of all.

Bring happiness into your life. Help someone today!


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322) Have A Goal; Share A Goal

Have a Goal; Share a Goal

No doubt, you have goals for yourself. If you’re aspiring to be more, you should. Additional professional designations. Sales targets. Career achievements. Fitness. Professional development. If you do have goals, that’s great. After all, study after study has shown that people who have goals are more successful than those who don’t.

But do you know what? Similar studies have also demonstrated that those who share their goals with others are far more successful than those who just have goals that they keep to themselves. Interesting, isn’t it? This action seems to keep you on track.

Knowing this, doesn’t it make sense to share your hopes, dreams and aspirations with select people in your network?

While it may seem risky to do so, being vulnerable like this has the added bonus of further building your relationship with those in whom you’ve confided. They will rally around you. Cheer for you. And have an incentive to help you more.

So, have a goal. And share a goal with someone you know.


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274) A Perfect Mistake

A Perfect Mistake

On June 10th, 2010, Detroit Tigers’ pitcher Armando Galarraga was only two outs away from pitching the perfect game. This is one of the rarest of achievements in major league baseball – facing 27 batters and retiring 27 batters in the same game.

Unfortunately for Galarraga, the first-base umpire, Jim Joyce, made a mistake. He called a runner safe at first base when the replay clearly showed he was out. The perfect game was lost.

After the game, players and fans were outraged at Joyce. They demanded the umpire’s termination or suspension. Tensions were high.

Realizing he’d made an errant call Joyce made an uncharacteristic move. He went out of his way to find and apologize to Galarraga. In turn, the young pitcher made a public declaration of forgiveness. These gestures served to defuse the situation.

The lesson is simple. In time you’ll be wronged and in time you’ll do wrong. Always be open to contrition. And always be open to forgiveness.


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300) Referrals Beget Referrals

Referrals Beget Referrals

In his book Beyond Referrals: How To Use the Perpetual Revenue System to Convert Referrals into High-Value Clients, best-selling author Bill Cates shares his thoughts on the litany of benefits that referrals offer. One is that referrals beget referrals. Cates shares:

“A client obtained through a referral is more likely to give referrals. And since many clients will give you multiple referrals over time, your business growth is exponential.”

Yes, Cates is correct, one referral leads to more and more referrals. For this reason, if you’re in business you should invest time into activities that build referral opportunities.

  • Make time to attend events where you can be known and get to know others.
  • Volunteer your time in the community (and allot time for your team to do the same).
  • Take the time to do something extraordinary for significant contacts and clients on their special days.

Invest this time in referral opportunities, as the rate of return is unmatched.


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297) Networking Versus Schmoozing

Networking Versus Schmoozing

As author Diane Darling shares in her bestselling book The Networking Survival Guide: Practical Advice to Help You Gain Confidence, Approach People, and Get the Success You Want, networking is sometimes dismissed as “schmoozing, and thus has the connotation of creating a very superficial connection that benefits only the schmoozer.”

Darling goes on to explain that schmoozing is a situation where the schmoozer is out solely for themselves. They are looking to take, and nothing else. And that’s not networking.

Networking is an ongoing relationship that has its foundation firmly established in mutual benefit. This is not to say that networking is a tit-for-tat exchange or transaction. It does mean, however, that each side of a networking relationship has their eyes and ears continually open for things that could benefit the other.

And while in the networking relationship there might not be a continual flow of benefit, the parties come through for one another on a consistent basis.

Darling’s lesson is simple: Never schmooze; Always Network!


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.