294) Newton’s Law And Networking

Newton's Law and Networking

In her book Rainmaker Roadmap: A Step-by-Step Guide to Building a Prosperous Business, author, speaker and consultant Kimberly Rice addresses a common occurrence when building and growing a healthy network. That is, the uncertainty surrounding when and why you reach out to your network and what to say when you do.

In response, Rice draws on Newton’s law of motion: “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.” In networking terms, the more goodwill you extend, the more it will come back to you.

She shares that your “reaching out” messages should have a helpful spirit, with the true intention of checking in. Checking in on your contact’s business. Or seeing how they are making out with a recent transition or new position. Or following up on something personal in their life.

So, add a little physics to your networking skills with Newton’s law of motion. Sincerely reach out to someone. And then expect an equal and opposite reaction.


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301. The Hostess Mindset

The Hostess Mindset

According to Alison Henderson, body language expert and founder of Moving Image Consulting, one way to position yourself to get the most out of networking events is to take on the mindset of being the host.

That is, rather than attending an event hoping that others will serve you, approach the gathering as if it is your role to greet, connect and be helpful to others. In short, you would conduct yourself just as if it were a party in your own home.

The benefit of this mindset is three-fold. First, as you look to serve others, you will naturally make more and better contacts with attendees. Second, you’ll be viewed by all as being gracious and helpful, drawing more people to want to be associated with you. And, finally, adopting this mindset will ensure that your body language stays open, resulting in you appearing more available and approachable.

So, at the next event, whether it’s yours or not, be the hostess with the most-est.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6QD3YnXJnA&list=UU9MhyoH6dVu-mofncAz7XmA&index=34&t=0s


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302. The Many Flavors To Your Introduction

The Many Flavors to Your Introduction

You might feel that there is little creativity in crafting how you introduce yourself. After all, there are only a few ways to say who you are and who you work for. And if that’s all you’re saying, you’re no doubt right. An introduction is bland or boring.

However, when introducing yourself no one ever said you have to limit yourself to what amounts to a professional name, rank and serial number.

Prepare to move beyond the mundane. Share a little bit of what you do. And stop thinking that “There is nothing to what I do.” Give yourself some credit. Think it through. There is a litany of different where’s and how’s to what you do.

And with that, you add dimension to your introduction by being informative or educational. Or, you can really spice it up by being amusing or startling.

Your introduction is not a “vanilla or chocolate” proposition. Rather, it’s like Baskin-Robbins and you have 31 flavors to share.


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323) Catching Train A

Catching Train A

Follow this word problem. Train A leaves the station at 8 o’clock going west at 50 miles per hour. Then an hour later, train B leaves the same station going in the same direction and also at 50 miles per. At what point will train B catch train A? The answer is never.

This is not a trick question. Rather, it’s meant to illustrate a point. Train A represents the crowded marketplace within which you operate. There are direct competitors. There might be alternative offerings to your product or service. There’s even the notion of doing without what you have to offer.

In short, no one has to hire you, and no one has to do business with you. To become relevant and capitalize on opportunities, you have to do a little more. You certainly need to be a little smarter. You need to work harder.

Train A won’t wait for you to catch up. You simply must move a little faster.


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327) “Throwing A Dart” Networking

"Throwing a Dart" Networking

An important aspect of successful networking is knowing what to do. However, also important is knowing what not to do in building a network.

In his book, Who Do You Need To Meet?, networking maven Rob Thomas shares:

“Some who network treat it like a numbers game. They gather a pile of business cards that they add to their growing pile of faceless names and forgotten intentions. This is what I call ‘throwing a dart’ networking. Maybe you will magically score, but typically you won’t.”

As Thomas implies, your networking efforts should not be the equivalent of pitching sharp objects at a board and hoping something hits just right. His foundational principle of networking is that the lifeline of a business is relationships and those relationships are between people. Those relationships are not built through mass e-mails that amount to meaningless follow up. Rather they are formed person by person, one at a time.


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311) The Four Horsemen of Doomed Relationships

The Four Horsemen of Doomed Relationships

Doctors Julie and John Gottman, in working with thousands of married couples over dozens and dozens of studies, have shown that four communication styles serve to doom a relationship.

  1. Criticism: A person lodges a complaint against another that serves to attack the core of their character.
  2. Contempt: Going beyond mere criticism, a person also uses disrespect, mockery, sarcasm, ridicule, eye-rolling, or scoffing to make another feel despised and worthless.
  3. Defensiveness: To deflect from their own irresponsibility or shortcoming, a person employs counter-attacks, lame excuses, or plays the innocent victim.
  4. Stonewalling: Rather than dealing with issues, a person withdraws from the interaction, shuts down, and simply stops responding to their partner. 

The Gottmans have shown that these four behaviors serve to spell doom for most any marriage. The reality is, however, that these four horsemen have no place in any relationship, personal or professional. Don’t employ them; don’t allow yourself to be a victim of them.


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271) Sears To Wal-Mart And Beyond

Sears to Wal-Mart and Beyond

In 1962, the retail giant Sears, Roebuck and Company was poised to celebrate its 100th anniversary. Its annual sales were somewhere north of $10 billion dollars and it was starting to expand throughout North America and beyond. That same year, Sam Walton opened the first Wal-Mart Discount Store in tiny Rogers, Arkansas.

Fast forward to today. One of these is a household name, with millions of employees, and annual sales of over a half a trillion dollars. The other is now virtually unknown by much of the population and a punchline for those who remember it.

This is more than an interesting contrast. There are a couple lessons to be had. First, don’t ever let anyone tell you that you can’t out-work, out-think, and out-execute a competitor that is much bigger than you.

Second, no matter how your professional life grows, don’t ever get into the mindset that you don’t have to innovate and improve.


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268) Everything You Say, You Need To Hear

Everything You Say, You Need to Hear

You’re a leader, right? Whether it’s a large company, or a decent-sized team of people or just a small somebody needing your guidance. Whomever, however, you play the role of a mentor.

No doubt, in this position you share ideas, thoughts and wisdom. Great! That’s an important aspect to the role.

Here’s the reality, however: Everything you say, you need to hear. Think about that.

When you encourage someone with words like “keep working hard,” that message also applies to you.

When you cheer on another with a pep talk like, “hang in there; things will get better,” that is some medicine you also need to take from time to time.

When you guide another with wisdom such as, “be sure to have a clear vision and set definitive goals to get there,” that sage advice works the same for you.

As a leader, you endeavor to inspire others with words. Remember to listen to those words too.


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269) Habits Make You

Habits Make You

Frederick Matthias Alexander once said, “People do not necessarily decide their futures, they decide their habits and their habits decide their futures.”

An Australian actor who developed an educational process that helped people recognize and overcome habitual limitations – FM Alexander said this over 100 years ago. And this notion is now widely accepted. Your habits make you.

Knowing this, take an honest inventory of your routine actions and behaviors.

Are you quick to anger? Do you procrastinate at times? Do you find that you shrink from certain challenges or situations? Do you fail to follow through?

If you’re having an issue with any one of these (or any one of two dozen more), know that you can absolutely change the trajectory of your life by simply working to change a habit. Find a habit you can easily correct and do so. Then move on to the next. In time, your new habits will serve to make you into something great.


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