Never Stop Giving

Never Stop Giving

“How do I go about getting others to know, like & trust me?” In the world of business and professional networking, that is the $64,000 question. One answer to this question is Never Stop Giving.

The Golden Rule of Networking

The Golden Rule of Networking states “Give first, get second.” In short, if you want to get things FROM your network, you first need to give things TO your network. If you are not sure what you have to give, here are some ideas.

  • Give referrals or additional contacts.
  • Share opportunities.
  • Connect people to information, such as book titles, websites, and groups on Facebook or LinkedIn.
  • You can even give intangibles, such as encouragement and support.

Regardless of what you give, the bottom line is this: give, give, give! When you give to others they cannot help but know, like, and trust you. And, as a result, they will want to return the generosity. In addition, you will develop the reputation of being a generous person. This will inspire others to want to contribute to you, as they trust that you are likely to give back.

Giving is Powerful

Giving is powerful and should become almost a daily habit.

  • Share information with others and they will share information back.
  • Give referrals to centers of influence in your network and they will go out of their way to return the deed.
  • Help your prospective clients with things unrelated to what you sell and you will be forever on the top of their mind (perhaps referring you clients down the road).
  • Be supportive of your clients and vendors and they will rave to others about you.

Therefore, with everyone you encounter, ask yourself this: “In what way could I help them?” When the answers come to you, take action. That will build know, like, and trust like nothing else. And remember to never stop giving!


Learn more about networking and AmSpirit Business Connections at www.amspirit.com.

Networking Rx: Working The Networking Event (EPS 214)

Frank Agin, author and founder of AmSpirit Business Connections, responds to questions asked by sales pitch expert Nick Capozzi about working a room. Connect with Nick via LinkedIn … https://www.linkedin.com/in/nick-capozzi/

https://networkingrx.libsyn.com/working-the-networking-event-eps-214

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://www.amspirit.com/franchise.php.

Networking Rx: Morag Barrett – Four Relationship Dynamics (EPS 213)

Frank Agin, author and founder of AmSpirit Business Connections, talks with executive coach and leadership development expert Morag Barrett about the four relationship dynamics she profiles in her book Cultivate. Reach out to Morag via morag@skyeteam.com.

https://networkingrx.libsyn.com/morag-barrett-four-relationship-dynamics-eps-213

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://www.amspirit.com/franchise.php.

Creating Solid Networking Relationships

Creating Solid Networking Relationships

Creating solid networking relationships can be distilled down into three simple words: Know, Like & Trust.

  • You build relationships when people get to know you and you get to know them.
  • You build relationships when you get the people you know to like you.
  • And you build relationships when you do the things that allow other people to trust you.

Here is a simple reality – people (yourself included) do business with those they Know, Like & Trust.

You likely have the accountant, banker, or financial planner in your life because, all things being equal, you Know, Like & Trust them. In fact, all things being UNequal, you would still opt to do business with the person you Know, Like, & Trust. Think about it. If you have automobile insurance, there is no question you could find the same coverage for less. Yet, you stay with the same agent. Why? You Know, Like & Trust that person.

Know, Like & Trust is a powerful component of human nature. If you can get people coming to the conclusion that they Know, Like & Trust you (at a very gut level), they will more likely be moved to help you … refer clients to you … introduce you to centers of influence … and direct you towards beneficial opportunities. So, at the end of the day, know-like-trust is the foundation for creating solid networking relationships.


Learn more about networking and AmSpirit Business Connections at www.amspirit.com.

Networking Rx: Listening Tips & Exercise (EPS 212)

Frank Agin, author and founder of AmSpirit Business Connections, continues his conversation with communication coach Marilyn L. Gordon, who shares a litany of listening tips and a listening exercise.

https://networkingrx.libsyn.com/listening-tips-exercise-eps-212

For more information on AmSpirit Business Connections and its franchise opportunity program, contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com or visit http://www.amspirit.com/franchise.php.

294) Newton’s Law And Networking

Newton's Law and Networking

In her book Rainmaker Roadmap: A Step-by-Step Guide to Building a Prosperous Business, author, speaker and consultant Kimberly Rice addresses a common occurrence when building and growing a healthy network. That is, the uncertainty surrounding when and why you reach out to your network and what to say when you do.

In response, Rice draws on Newton’s law of motion: “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.” In networking terms, the more goodwill you extend, the more it will come back to you.

She shares that your “reaching out” messages should have a helpful spirit, with the true intention of checking in. Checking in on your contact’s business. Or seeing how they are making out with a recent transition or new position. Or following up on something personal in their life.

So, add a little physics to your networking skills with Newton’s law of motion. Sincerely reach out to someone. And then expect an equal and opposite reaction.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.

301. The Hostess Mindset

The Hostess Mindset

According to Alison Henderson, body language expert and founder of Moving Image Consulting, one way to position yourself to get the most out of networking events is to take on the mindset of being the host.

That is, rather than attending an event hoping that others will serve you, approach the gathering as if it is your role to greet, connect and be helpful to others. In short, you would conduct yourself just as if it were a party in your own home.

The benefit of this mindset is three-fold. First, as you look to serve others, you will naturally make more and better contacts with attendees. Second, you’ll be viewed by all as being gracious and helpful, drawing more people to want to be associated with you. And, finally, adopting this mindset will ensure that your body language stays open, resulting in you appearing more available and approachable.

So, at the next event, whether it’s yours or not, be the hostess with the most-est.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6QD3YnXJnA&list=UU9MhyoH6dVu-mofncAz7XmA&index=34&t=0s


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.

302. The Many Flavors To Your Introduction

The Many Flavors to Your Introduction

You might feel that there is little creativity in crafting how you introduce yourself. After all, there are only a few ways to say who you are and who you work for. And if that’s all you’re saying, you’re no doubt right. An introduction is bland or boring.

However, when introducing yourself no one ever said you have to limit yourself to what amounts to a professional name, rank and serial number.

Prepare to move beyond the mundane. Share a little bit of what you do. And stop thinking that “There is nothing to what I do.” Give yourself some credit. Think it through. There is a litany of different where’s and how’s to what you do.

And with that, you add dimension to your introduction by being informative or educational. Or, you can really spice it up by being amusing or startling.

Your introduction is not a “vanilla or chocolate” proposition. Rather, it’s like Baskin-Robbins and you have 31 flavors to share.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.

323) Catching Train A

Catching Train A

Follow this word problem. Train A leaves the station at 8 o’clock going west at 50 miles per hour. Then an hour later, train B leaves the same station going in the same direction and also at 50 miles per. At what point will train B catch train A? The answer is never.

This is not a trick question. Rather, it’s meant to illustrate a point. Train A represents the crowded marketplace within which you operate. There are direct competitors. There might be alternative offerings to your product or service. There’s even the notion of doing without what you have to offer.

In short, no one has to hire you, and no one has to do business with you. To become relevant and capitalize on opportunities, you have to do a little more. You certainly need to be a little smarter. You need to work harder.

Train A won’t wait for you to catch up. You simply must move a little faster.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.

327) “Throwing A Dart” Networking

"Throwing a Dart" Networking

An important aspect of successful networking is knowing what to do. However, also important is knowing what not to do in building a network.

In his book, Who Do You Need To Meet?, networking maven Rob Thomas shares:

“Some who network treat it like a numbers game. They gather a pile of business cards that they add to their growing pile of faceless names and forgotten intentions. This is what I call ‘throwing a dart’ networking. Maybe you will magically score, but typically you won’t.”

As Thomas implies, your networking efforts should not be the equivalent of pitching sharp objects at a board and hoping something hits just right. His foundational principle of networking is that the lifeline of a business is relationships and those relationships are between people. Those relationships are not built through mass e-mails that amount to meaningless follow up. Rather they are formed person by person, one at a time.


Like what you’ve read? Prefer to hear it as a podcast or daily flash briefing? Subscribe to the Networking Rx Minute podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts.