The Friend Card

One of the great things about AmSpirit Business Connections is that members tend to become great friends. Mind you, these people represent a variety of businesses or professions and these individuals, for the most part, did not know one another before they got involved. When they become great friends, they establish a heightened sense of “know, like and trust,” which is the required foundation for the productive exchange of quality referrals.

One of the bad things about AmSpirit Business Connections is that members tend to become great friends. You see, for Chapters to become and remain productive, members need to be accountable and reliable to one another.

From time to time, however, some of these fellow members stray from this necessary standard (they do not attend meetings … they do not settle their financial obligations to the Chapter … they consistently arrive late or leave early … they are excessively disruptive … they fail to give referrals).

When they stray, it is difficult to confront these great friends with these transgressions.

To keep a productive Chapter, however, you need to address these matters (as difficult as it might be). If you don’t, you will lose money. It will not be abrupt or immediate, like losing a wallet or having a client sever a relationship. Nevertheless, these transgressions will impact you financially.

You see, in time your Chapter will generate less referrals (some of which would have been for you). In time your Chapter will lose committed members, disenchanted with the inequity (meaning less people to generate referrals for you). And in time, guests will become more and more reluctant to become part of the Chapter (further limiting your opportunities).

As such, if you do not confront the transgressions, you will lose money. So friendship aside, you must be committed to tackle any deviation from the AmSpirit Business Connections’ standard for accountability and reliability.

When you do, however, you might have a fellow member who, in demeanor and word, effectively says, “Hey, we’re friends aren’t we? So what’s the big deal? Turn a blind eye towards my transgressions.” They are playing the “Friend” card. In short, they are attempting to pit your friendship against the best interests of the Chapter.

At this moment, remember you have a “Friend” card too. It effectively says, “Hey, we’re friends aren’t we? If so, then as a friend you will do all you can to uphold the standards of this Chapter, because if you don’t you are costing all of us money. And a great friend would not do that, would they?”

Remember, for Chapters to become and remain productive, members need to be accountable and reliable to one another. If this does not happen, everyone loses. Thus, as a member looking to ensure that a great environment persists in AmSpirit Business Connections, you need to do all you can, including playing your “Friend” card.

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